Posts Tagged ‘demonstration’

The CONSTITUTION is our PERMIT!

The Egyptian people are finding themselves under increasing attack from their military and have called on the world #Occupy movements for a day of solidarity with them.

On Monday, the GA of OccupySF passed a proposal to march this Saturday in solidarity with the Egyptian Revolution. Our friends who inspired the #OWS movement are now asking us to inspire them. The Egyptian military, now firmly in power, is repressing thousands of civilians by taking them to military court where they are not allowed to call witnesses and have limited access to lawyers. This military is funded by the U.S. government, which provides over a billion dollars in aid every year–and the G8, IMF and Gulf states are themselves promising the Egyptian military loans of $35 billion. Let us all band together and defend OUR movement! Come join us! Meet at the Federal Reserve Building at 101 Market St and march with the Egyptian people!

The Egyptian people are finding themselves under increasing attack from their military and have called on the world Occupy movements for a day of solidarity with them. On Monday, the GA of #OccupySF passed a proposal to march this Saturday in solidarity with the Egyptian Revolution. Our friends who inspired the #OWS movement are now asking us to inspire them. The Egyptian military, now firmly in power, is repressing thousands of civilians by taking them to military court where they are not allowed to call witnesses and have limited access to lawyers. This military is funded by the U.S. government, which provides over a billion dollars in aid every year–and the G8, IMF and Gulf states are themselves promising the Egyptian military loans of $35 billion. Let us all band together and defend OUR movement! Come join us! Meet at the Federal Reserve Building at 101 Market St and march with the Egyptian people!

Occupy San Francisco Sign

A note from our non-violence committee.

“After the events of last Saturday, the Nonviolence Committee was formed to study and promote effective Nonviolence strategies for Occupy Denver. One of the most frequent comments we heard from people was that they could feel the situation becoming increasingly tense and confusing, but didn’t feel that there was anything they could do to stop it.

Our first priority was to develop a tool for people to use to de-escalate those sorts of tense situations, and ensure that rash action on the part of individual protesters or law enforcement officers would not cause a general panic. With that in mind, we developed an extremely simple procedure.

This procedure is simply offered as a tool to bring a calming atmosphere to potential confrontation, and is not meant to be the only nonviolent response to be used in any situation.
We encourage people to be conscious of their safety and to exercise common sense. Since brevity takes priority over subtlety when designing these types of handouts, here is a more detailed explanation of the procedure and of alternative actions people might take.

1. Hold hands or link arms with the people near you.

This creates a sense of togetherness and acts as a calming influence. It also helps to stop instigators from darting in and out of a crowd and creating the impression that the entire crowd is behaving antagonistically. However, there are times when this might not be appropriate, such as when you need to move out of the way quickly or when it might be interpreted as a barrier or aggression by law enforcement.

2. Sit down.

By sitting down, you make it clear to law enforcement, your fellow protesters, media, and other observers that you are not acting aggressively. You ensure that you cannot be used as camouflage by people wishing to provoke violence, and make it less likely you will be mistaken for an aggressor. When people are standing in a dense crowd, it is very difficult to tell one from another and to judge motives of individuals in the general confusion and shouting. A mob mentality can build up that reinforces anger and aggression. By sitting down you help break that cycle, and reinforce calm and a desire for peace.
Clearly, there are situations in which sitting can cause safety concerns. If you are worried about a stampede, or think you might be injured by people stepping over you, move to a place you feel safe sitting down. If you are unable to sit or strongly prefer standing, move behind the rows of people sitting down and join hands with other people standing there.

3. Say “Shh”.

A low shushing sound is seen as calming to people around the world. When we see confusing situations resulting in unjust action, it is natural to try to explain that we are a peaceful protest. But when you have large groups of people shouting at once, any possible message is lost in the noise and all shouting is likely to be seen as aggressive. By saying “shh” we audibly call attention to the nonviolent response in a calming way that cannot be misinterpreted as aggression.
There are many other ways that this can be achieved. When you first try to get those around you to sit down with you, it may make more sense to use a chant of “Sit down, sit down.” When the situation is calm enough, a meditative silence may be appropriate. Or a calming and peaceful song. It is entirely up to the people participating in the de-escalation. The important thing to remember is that the calmer the situation is, the safer everyone is and the more effectively we will be able to get our message across.

The Nonviolence Committee is a completely open committee, and we encourage everyone to join.

If you’d like to get on our email list, go to http://groups.google.com/group/occupy-denver-nonviolence-committee and sign up. We hold Nonviolence trainings and discussions after every GA, and we would love to see you there. Thank you very much for your time, and we hope to see you on site.”

Absolutely enormous crowd hit the street in Oakland in support of Oakland. They took over a highway;  there’s got to be a good 100,000 people there.

From DenverDirect

I went to Occupy Denver yesterday because Michael Moore was going to make an appearance, and I did get some footage of the statement he made. But before he arrived, this gentleman appeared, and made one of the most moving statements I have heard from the Occupy movement to date.

There are problems with the camera autofocus, but, please, stick around until the end of the video. It’s worth it.

Then you realize that there is people, in this country, that are insensitive and greedy enough to actually MAKE FUN of who runs out of luck and mocking the homeless, at Halloween. Like if losing your house is a fun game.

This makes me sick, not a random guy Noah Gauthier on a street, that spurts out some rough but still poetic sentences, laying down what is boiling among all of us.  Us, the people “Livin’ in the Land Where the Whip Still Cracks”.

Update: His name is Noah Gauthier. Thank you Noah Gauthier, thank you for your passion and your soul.

From Gizmodo

In response to a flood of Facebook and YouTube videos that depict police abuse, a new trend in law enforcement is gaining popularity. In at least three states, it is now illegal to record any on-duty police officer.

Even if the encounter involves you and may be necessary to your defense, and even if the recording is on a public street where no expectation of privacy exists.

The legal justification for arresting the “shooter” rests on existing wiretapping or eavesdropping laws, with statutes against obstructing law enforcement sometimes cited. Illinois, Massachusetts, and Maryland are among the 12 states in which all parties must consent for a recording to be legal unless, as with TV news crews, it is obvious to all that recording is underway. Since the police do not consent, the camera-wielder can be arrested. Most all-party-consent states also include an exception for recording in public places where “no expectation of privacy exists” (Illinois does not) but in practice this exception is not being recognized.

Massachusetts attorney June Jensen represented Simon Glik who was arrested for such a recording. She explained, “[T]he statute has been misconstrued by Boston police. You could go to the Boston Common and snap pictures and record if you want.” Legal scholar and professor Jonathan Turley agrees, “The police are basing this claim on a ridiculous reading of the two-party consent surveillance law – requiring all parties to consent to being taped. I have written in the area of surveillance law and can say that this is utter nonsense.”

The courts, however, disagree. A few weeks ago, an Illinois judge rejected a motion to dismiss an eavesdropping charge against Christopher Drew, who recorded his own arrest for selling one-dollar artwork on the streets of Chicago. Although the misdemeanor charges of not having a peddler’s license and peddling in a prohibited area were dropped, Drew is being prosecuted for illegal recording, a Class I felony punishable by 4 to 15 years in prison.

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From The Guardian

Naomi Wolf arrested

 

Officer Michael Daragjati had no idea that the FBI was listening to his phone calls. Otherwise he would probably not have described his arrest and detention of an innocent black New Yorker in the manner he did.

Daragjati boasted to a woman friend that, while on patrol in Staten Island, he had “fried another nigger”. It was “no big deal”, he added. The FBI, which had been investigating another matter, then tried to work out what had happened.

According to court documents released in New York, Daragjati and his partner had randomly stopped and frisked a black man who had become angry and asked for Daragjati’s name and badge number. Daragjati, 32, and with eight years on the force, had no reason to stop the man, and had found nothing illegal. But he arrested him and fabricated an account of him resisting arrest. The man, now referred to in papers only as John Doe because of fears for his safety, spent two nights in jail. He had merely been walking alone through the neighbourhood.

The shocking story has added to a growing sense that there are serious problems of indiscipline and law-breaking in US police forces. Last weekthe feminist author Naomi Wolf was arrested outside an awards ceremony in Manhattan. She had been advising Occupy Wall Street protesters of their rights to continue demonstrating outside the event. Instead, as she joined the protest, she was carted off to jail in her evening gown. That incident is only the most high-profile of many apparently illegal police actions around the protests. One senior officer, deputy inspector Anthony Bologna, created headlines worldwide when he pepper-sprayed young women behind a police barricade.

A report from the New York Civil Liberties Union recently looked at police use of Taser stun guns in the state, and revealed that in 60% of incidents where they were used, the incident did not meet the recommended criteria for such a weapon. Some cases involved people already handcuffed and 40% involved “at risk” subjects such as children, the elderly or mentally ill. “This disturbing pattern of misuse and abuse endangers lives,” said the NYCLU’s executive director, Donna Lieberman.

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