Posts Tagged ‘corporate’

Buy more TV time for this ad: http://bit.ly/s8GFBr
It has already aired on Fox News, History Channel, Bloomberg and elsewhere!

Most important demand is ending the FED because:

  • They’ve enslaved the U.S. government with debt.
  • They create money out of thin air.
  • The banks that now dominate the U.S. banking system use the FED as a tool to make money.
  • They devalue our currency.
  • They manipulate the U.S. economy by setting national interest rates.
  • They control the money supply.
  • The Federal Reserve is not part of the US government.
  • They’ve become too powerful.
  • They’re not accountable to anyone.

Thirty large and profitable U.S. corporations paid no income taxes from 2008 through to 2010, despite making combined pre-tax profits of $160billion, a report out today said.

A comprehensive analysis of 280 corporations on the Fortune 500 list found that their tax subsidies amounted to $222.7bn in the last three years.

The report, from Citizens for Tax Justice and the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, arrives as Congress faces rising demands for tax reform but seems unable or unwilling to act.

Under half: Corporations are paying far less income tax as a percentage than the statutory rate of 35 per cent, shown in graph of 2008 totalsUnder half: Corporations are paying far less income tax as a percentage than the statutory rate of 35 per cent, shown in graph of 2008 totals

This movie can (And will, if you watch it) explain a LOT of things about the Federal Reserve, the *LATE* American Dream and the Actual American Nightmare.

PLEASE, watch it in its entirety, and THEN look for some informations about Rothschild and the Rothschild group. When you do, you will understand that John F. Kennedy died trying to prevent what is happening today.

Ok, now you may want to read the TIMELINE that explains the History behind the movie.

by Gwen Sharp11 hours ago at 12:45 pm

To add to the Halloween spirit, sketchy Halloween costumes and the social significance of costume themes Ann K., Dolores R., Tessa S., Zeynep A., and occasional guest blogger Brady Potts all sent in an opinion column that ran in the New York Times on Friday about a costume party at Steven J. Baum, a law firm near Buffalo, NY. Steven J. Baum specializes in representing banks and mortgage companies as they attempt to foreclose on homes and evict the residents; according to the NYT piece, it is the largest such firm in New York, representing clients such as Bank of America and JP Morgan Chase.

Banker scum dressed as homeless foreclosure fraud victim holds a sign that reads "3rd party squatter - I lost my home & I was NEVER Served" - Please, notice their NAILS. these ladies are by all means NO homeless.

Apparently the company has a big annual Halloween party, with employees encouraged to dress up and the office elaborately decorated.  The theme in one department was… Mocking people who are losing their homes. Part of the office was decorated as “Baum Estates,” a set of foreclosed-upon homes, and some employees dressed up as residents of homes in foreclosure, whom they depict as dirty, pathetic, booze-loving liars.

There is only one thing that goes through my mind and I could say to these “ladies”… And it’s…
“F@CK YOU!”

I always loved this song, and now, guys, it’s actual as if it was released today!

Twenty-five years I’m alive here still
Trying to get up that great big hill of hope
For a destination

I realized quickly when I knew I should
That the world was made up of this brotherhood of man
For whatever that means

And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying in bed Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar.

And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?

And I say: HEY! yeah yeaaah, HEY yeah yea
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say: HEY! yeah yeaaah, HEY yeah yea
I said hey, what’s going on?

ooh, ooh ooooooooooooooooh
ooh, ooh ooooooooooooooooh

and I try, oh my god do I try
I try all the time, in this institution

And I pray, oh my god do I pray
I pray all sanctity
For a revolution.

And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying bed
Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar

And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

ooh, ooh ooooooooooooooooh ooooooooooooooooh

Twenty-five years I’m alive here still
Trying to get up that great big hill of hope
for a destination
mmh mh

 

14 years old. The English teacher asks him to write what “Courage” means to him, and… GOOD BOY!  🙂

The right answer to the debt crisis is simple. And it only requires two steps.

1. Do not give bailouts to nations, even if that means they default. This isn’t good news if you bought, say, Greek or Portuguese bonds, but there are two big advantages of default. First, it means that the bailouts come to an end so the debt bubble doesn’t get even worse. Second, it forces the affected governments to move – overnight – to a balanced-budget rule.

So what’s the downside? There isn’t one. The aforementioned bondholders won’t be happy. They gambled in the expectation that bailouts would enable them to get high returns, but that’s their problem. Overpaid government workers and greedy interest groups in the affected nations doubtlessly will be very upset because the gravy train gets derailed, but that’s a feature, not a bug.

2. If banks become insolvent because they recklessly lent money to governments  that default, those financial institutions should be allowed to fail. More specifically, they should be put into something akin to receivership (similar to what the U.S. did 20 years ago with the S&L crisis and a few years ago with WaMu and IndyMac, and also like what Sweden did in the early 1990s). This automatically prevents financial crisis since the financial sector gets recapitalized, but without the moral hazard and/or zombie bank problems associated with TARP-style bailouts.

So what’s the downside? There isn’t one, at least compared to the alternatives. Governments would be holding harmless depositors at the failed banks, so there would be additional debt. But this debt would be a one-time burden for a policy that actually stops the bleeding, and there would be no moral hazard since shareholders, bondholders, and senior management at the failed banks would get nothing.

This raises an obvious question. If my proposed solution is so simple, why aren’t governments choosing this option?

Part of the answer is that simple solutions aren’t necessarily easy solutions. We know how to fix America’s fiscal crisis, for instance, but that doesn’t mean it will happen. Governments will sometimes do the right thing – but only after they’ve exhausted every other option.

Europe isn’t quite at that stage. Yes, Greece is being allowed to default, which is a small step in the right direction, but the political elite hope that the right blend of additional bailouts and patchwork reforms can fix the problem.

I suppose that might happen, especially if the world economy somehow begins to boom. But don’t hold your breath.