Archive for October, 2011

Wall Street ruins lives for that Blood Money
In Iraq shoulders dying for that Blood Money

Politicians committing crimes for that Blood Money
Fox News telling lies for that Blood Money

We ignoring human rights for that Blood Money
The environment sacrificed for that Blood Money

We all going to pay the price for that Blood Money
Thats what they want from me

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Here we go… This is an old strategy, used all over the world, to make a demonstration turn violent, and have an excuse to send in riot police and break it.

DON’T FALL FOR IT! INSULATE THE PROVOCATEURS!

See what happened in Rome, on #OCT15, with COP infiltrated in the demonstration and then read about the Strategy of Francesco Cossiga.

This MUST be taken with extreme seriousness, watching out for one another and being extremely careful about who is mixing in the crowd. Violence must be avoided at all costs.

We are NOT violent, let’s not allow some corrupted provocateurs to ruin everything!

I always loved this song, and now, guys, it’s actual as if it was released today!

Twenty-five years I’m alive here still
Trying to get up that great big hill of hope
For a destination

I realized quickly when I knew I should
That the world was made up of this brotherhood of man
For whatever that means

And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying in bed Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar.

And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?

And I say: HEY! yeah yeaaah, HEY yeah yea
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say: HEY! yeah yeaaah, HEY yeah yea
I said hey, what’s going on?

ooh, ooh ooooooooooooooooh
ooh, ooh ooooooooooooooooh

and I try, oh my god do I try
I try all the time, in this institution

And I pray, oh my god do I pray
I pray all sanctity
For a revolution.

And so I cry sometimes
When I’m lying bed
Just to get it all out
What’s in my head
And I, I am feeling a little peculiar

And so I wake in the morning
And I step outside
And I take a deep breath and I get real high
And I scream from the top of my lungs
What’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

And I say, hey hey hey hey
I said hey, what’s going on?

ooh, ooh ooooooooooooooooh ooooooooooooooooh

Twenty-five years I’m alive here still
Trying to get up that great big hill of hope
for a destination
mmh mh

 

#OCCUPYSACRAMENTO Zombie March

Posted: October 30, 2011 in Uncategorized

What? It’s Halloween Time!!!

GENEVA, Switzerland – Gorka Cruz, thirty-three years old id a Swiss Citizen. Banker.

Nice voice, French accent, and the capacity of making some music, he has become the most known among the Geneva indignados.

With his song “The global economy is about to crash” he is launching a very popular refrain, that is spreading among the oppositors to the financial system.

The guy, even though he worked for four years at Barclay’s Bank, handling Hedge Funds, is a very original man. Every year, he sets aside part of his earnings and goes to India, to spend time in humanitarian activities. The popularity arrived, though, through a YouTube video, which we are showing you, where Gorka, armed with a guitar, predicts the imminent collapse of the system, and end the video by jumping off the Coulouvrenière bridge, in Geneva.

This is not a pessimistic message. Gorka tries to awaken the people, to build a healthier world and, to the “La Tribune de Geneve” who interviewed him, he said “My approach may seem contradictory, but working in a bank does not prevent me from bein critical toward the system. Every employee is just a gear in the machine, and by himself he can’t do much. There is a need of a global awakening of the consciences, to change the World

From BoingBoing.net

Gaius, a self-described member of the 1% (“Herman Cain’s 9-9-9 plan would save me roughly $400,000 a year in taxes, and President Obama’s tax proposals would cost me more than $100,000”) writes on DailyKos in support of the Occupy movement and describes the absurdity of the pitched battles over raising taxes on the rich by a mere 3.5%:

Thus you can imagine my amazement this summer when I watched the Republicans in Congress push the United States to the brink of default – and the world to the brink of ruin – over whether to repeal a portion of the Bush tax cuts and raise my taxes by 3.5%. I know a lot of people with high incomes and even the conservatives among them were confused by that sequence of events. Here is a secret about rich people: we wouldn’t have noticed a 3.5% tax increase. That is not only because there isn’t a material difference between having $1 million and $965,000, which is obvious, but also because most of us don’t actually know how much money we are going to make in a given year. Most income at that level is the result of profits rather than salary, whether it comes in the form of bonuses, stock options, partnership distributions, dividends or capital gains. Profits are unpredictable and they tend to vary wildly. At my own firm, the general rule of thumb is that if we are within 5% of our budget for the year, everyone is happy and no one complains. A variation of 3.5% is merely a random blip.

I was not amazed but disgusted when John Boehner and his crew tried to justify the extremity of their position by rebranding the wealthy as “job creators.” While true in a very basic sense, it obscures the fact that jobs are a cost that is voluntarily incurred only as a result of demand. Hiring has no correlation at all to profits or to income – none. Let me keep more of my money without increasing customer demand and I will do just that – keep it. Perhaps I will spend a little more of it, though probably not, but even if I do it won’t help the economy very much. Here is another secret of the well-to-do: we don’t really buy much more stuff than everyone else. It may be more expensive stuff, sure, but I don’t buy cars, or appliances, or furniture, or anything else more frequently than the average consumer. The things I do spend more money on are services such as travel, entertainment, restaurants and landscaping, none of which generate well-paying middle class jobs. There, in a nutshell, is the sad explanation of what has happened to the American economy over the last 25 years of “trickle down” economics.

A Voice From the 1% (via Beth Pratt)

The protesters arrested for Occupying Nashville, specifically Legislative Plaza after the 10 p.m. curfew, come from different walks of life but share some common traits. For the most part, they’re white and unemployed or underemployed. They feel let down by the American Dream and hope their participation can make the country better for others.

Forty-eight were arrested, six of those twice. Some chose to share a glimpse of their lives with The Tennessean:

John H. Allen, 36, of Nashville works in data entry for a small Nashville company, but it’s a temporary job ending in January. Two weeks ago, he joined the movement by bringing supplies to the protesters camping on Legislative Plaza. “When I saw the police swarming in, it just wasn’t right,” he said.

Corey B. Amons, 23, of Cottontown is an artist and recent graduate of Vol State Community College. He is planning to go to Chicago to work on his bachelor’s degree in education. He has been with the Occupy Nashville movement from its beginning earlier this month.

Mike Anger, 30, of Lexington, Ky., is an unemployed bartender with a 6-year-old son. “It hit home with me,” he said. “You can’t miss what’s going on in our country. … I’ll stay with it until the end.”

Alesandra T. Bellos, 33, of Nashville and her sister run a company working with textiles. She stayed only a few nights on the plaza before being arrested. She and her husband stayed at a hotel on Wall Street during Occupy Wall Street.

James R. Bradley, 39, of Nashville is married to Bellos and runs a small software company in Nashville.

Jeremiah M. Carter, 19, of Bellevue co-owns a record label and works as a musician. He was in New York City for the Occupy Wall Street march and rallies in September and nearly got arrested there but escaped approaching officers.

Michael P. Custer, 47, of Nashville works as a cook. He said he has been a political activist his whole life and vows to be with the Occupy Nashville group on Legislative Plaza until he is “arrested or killed.”

Elizabeth Drake, 22, of Memphis is a student attending Southwest Tennessee Technical Community College but hopes to start nursing school in the fall. She was one of three Occupy Memphis protesters who came to Nashville to help the movement get more exposure. She, Alexandra Pusateri and Robert “Jade” Stowater were arrested together.

William W. Howell, 64, of Nashville works as a lobbyist and community organizer for Tennesseans for Fair Taxation. He has been married for 39 years to his wife, Margaret. They have two grown daughters. As troopers surrounded the group, Howell led protesters in reading from the Declaration of Independence.

Christopher Humprey, 24, of Nashville writes for The Contributorhomeless newspaper and also sells copies. Before he was homeless, he worked as a cook and barback. “I know how beautiful America is and how great it can be, and I want it to be that way,” he said “I want my rights and liberties.”

Adam K. Knight, 27, of Smyrna teaches eighth-grade English at Two Rivers Middle School and has been following Occupy Wall Street from day one. “If Metro Nashville Schools chooses to fire me for standing up for my constitutional rights, so be it,” he said.

Lindsey G. Krinks, 26, of Nashville works part time as a homeless advocate and is a student at Vanderbilt Divinity School along with her husband. “My faith compels me to be out here,” she said. “That’s my main motivator.”

Tyler Lawson, 25, of Mt. Juliet is employed as a sheet metal worker in a union. He was at the Thursday protest but said he decided not to get arrested because he had to work the next day.

Paula E. Painter, 55, of Cumberland City, Tenn. has been unemployed since last year. Her last job was at a local museum, which she had to leave to care for her ailing father. She has been arrested and released on environmental issues over the years.

Shauna C. Pluskota, 25, of Nashville works as a bartender downtown. When she first heard about Occupy Wall Street, she and a friend jumped in a car and went for three days. “I guess now I’m an activist,” she said. “I came to that realization this morning when I walked out of jail.”

Alexandra Pusateri, 20, of Memphis works as a freelance journalist and is a junior at the University of Memphis majoring in journalism and international studies. She was involved with Occupy Memphis for about a month before coming to Nashville.

Megan L. Riggs, 25, of Nashville works for Tennesseans for Fair Taxation. She handed her cellphone and journal to her boyfriend and then went to lock arms with those being arrested.

Connie L. Smith, 30, of Murfreesboro works as a customer service representative in the retail industry, has one child and found the Occupy Nashville group on Facebook.

Ben Spencer, 22, of Murfreesboro is unemployed and essentially homeless, bouncing around from friend to friend and living in his car. He last worked with a summer camp in Vermont.

Robert “Jade” Stowater, 27, of Memphis works in construction. On Thursday, someone came up to him in Memphis and announced that a group was leaving for Nashville in five minutes and had one seat left. “I think we need to get the rich people pretty much off their butts,” he said.

Eva N. Watler, 34, of Pegram works as a massage therapist and has been with Occupy Nashville since the beginning. She was at the Centennial Park rally this month.

Michael T. Weber, 35, of Fayetteville, Tenn., has been unemployed for a little more than two years. Before to that, he was over international development for a foundation based in New York. He is originally from Tennessee and moved back here when he lost his job.

William White, 21, of Mt. Juliet has been unemployed since graduating from Whites Creek High in 2008. “I watched Occupy Oakland on Livestream and saw how those protesters were being treated, and I knew I just couldn’t sit and watch anymore,” he said. “I had to get involved.”

From: The Tennessean